Portugal vs Spain

Spain vs. Portugal live stream info, TV channel, odds: How to watch World Cup 2018 on TV and online
This Group B showdown pits Cristiano Ronaldo against goalkeeper David de Gea, with so much at stake

Iberian rivals Portugal and Spain square off on Friday at the 2018 FIFA World Cup in the second match of Group B. The neighbors, with plenty of familiar players and similar styles, go to battle in what is arguably the most highly-anticipated groups stage match of the cup.
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With Iran and Morocco in their group, this is a match that will put the winner as the strong favorite to win the group, while a draw will leave both vulnerable to a shocking upset and potential early exit. For the loser, even more so.

Spain enters this game in good shape overall, but it is expected to be without defender Dani Carvajal, who has just returned to training. He isn’t expected to play in this one, though.

As for Portugal, the team is healthy and led by superstar Cristiano Ronaldo, who just won his third straight Champions League title with Real Madrid. There are no significant injuries for the reigning Euro 2016 champs.

Here’s how you can watch the match and more. And be sure to return a half an hour before kickoff for our live blog of the game:
How to watch Spain vs. Portugal

When: Friday at 2 p.m. ET
Where: Olimpiyskiy Stadium in Sochi
TV: Fox and Telemundo
Stream: fuboTV (Try for free)
Follow: CBS Sports App
Sportsline odds

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Prediction

The Iberian clasico goes to Spain, who take care of the Euro 2016 in rather convincing fashion, with a superior defense the main difference. Spain 3, Portugal 1.

OK, so maybe that’s not exactly the conversation that went down. But there is definitely a sense of one last hurrah about this Portugal team. It’s a collection of lovable, rogue thirty-somethings — with all their failings, foibles and faults, but also their experience, passion and sheer bloody-mindedness — coming together behind their G.O.A.T. contender and the wise coach with the sad eyes (and the penchant for tears).

You’ve got the one-footed winger with the teardrops tattooed on his face, Ricardo Quaresma, the baby-faced little midfield general, Joao Moutinho, and a trio of center-backs — the youngest of whom is 34 — who could easily double as nightclub bouncers (Pepe, Bruno Alves and Jose Fonte). Plus, of course, their own version of Highlander, Ronaldo, who is only in his 15th year of doing it at the highest level.

Portugal are confirmed underdogs and need things to go their way in order to have a shot, just like they did in 2016, when they squeezed through the group stage with three draws (including coming back three times in a single game against Hungary), then beat Croatia with a late, late, late strike in extra-time, beat Poland on penalties, survived Wales in the semifinal and defeated France with an extra-time wonder strike from Eder, who had hardly played that season.